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Archive for April, 2007

A ROCKY MOUNTAIN HIGH!

I’ll be participating in the Aug. 11-12 ROCKY MOUNTAIN WLS* SUMMIT
in Greeley,  an hour’s drive (I’m told) from Denver’s airport.
I’ll be giving a talk and several FREE WORKSHOPS, so if you  or
someone you love is lucky enough to live in the Rockies
but has been losing their battle
with morbid obesity alert them to this website:
                                       www.obesityandme.com
 
Where they can get alllll the particulars!
 
Dr. Monica Ganz, Ph.D., will be leading this life-changing event.
 
 *Weight Loss Surgery

PSSST! You Can Read My “TRUE CONFESSIONS” in the May issue…

If you’re in the Southeast, you can pick up your FREE copy of
the May issue of ORACLE 20-20 magazine, now! Beginning on page 7
you’ll find my article, "TRUE CONFESSIONS."
 
If you can’t get a copy where you live, email me &
I’ll email you a digitized reprint.
Or, you can try going online to:
 
My June 3rd workshop, Sun. 1:30- 4:30pm, will be in Atlanta and will introduce participants to the secret of overcoming self-sabotage to create a "post-diet life!" For more info, email me at
 
Have a fantastic Monday, y’all!
Lauralyn
 

NEW!! YOU GOTTA SEE THIS BRAND NEW WEBSITE!

So I’m one of those folks who doesn’t believe there can ever  be too much information! But, OK, ya gotta know what’s usable and what’s ignorable. Well, if you or someone you care about is struggling with obesity, here’s a new source of useful, practical information:
       tah dah!  www.obesityandme.com 
 
Its "mother" is the nationally reknowned champion of the cause and formerly morbidly obese sufferer,
        MONICA GANZ, Ph.D.
 
Give it a click, you won’t regret it. I mean, (gotta say it!) Whaddaya hafta looze?
 
Lauralyn

How Your Reptillian Brain Can be Turned from Sabateur to Bodyguard!

The Secret of Your Reptillian Brain!
 
This past weekend I had the pleasure of speaking and leading workshops on "The Secret to Overcoming Self-Sabotage" at the Obesity Help Conference in the L.A. area. www.obesityhelp.com/events/
 
I must admit that the Geico Car Insurance’s TV spokesperson, a gekko, has made my teaching about the reptillian brain (the amygdala, part of the Limbic System) a lot easier. Folks don’t seem to have as much resistance to understanding that it does not possess the capacity to pass judgement on anything. When it commences to terminate your current dream project, it is not because it considers your dream bad, weak, foolish, expensive, doomed or anything else that the doubting, heckling, cajoling, berating inner voice* has told you.
 
Your reptillian brain is preverbal and programmed to do front line sentry duty 24/7 to safeguard your life. It has been programmed to assess all incoming sensory data into one of two categories: safe-and-familiar, and known-threat-or-unfamiliar. As it has not been designed to accomodate a third category for unknown or unfamiliar incoming data, it goes on alert when it first encounters an unknown. The longer the situation remains unknown the more intense the alarm-and-arm response becomes. Eventually (and this is unique to each person) it arbitrarily determines that any stimulus that persists in being unrecognizable as friend or sanctuary must, by definition, be a threat.
 
At this point, your reptillian brain becomes an unstoppable doomsday machine and terminates the unfamiliar program or relationship through a sequence of self-sabotage behaviors that leave the rest of the personality shell-shocked and close to despair. Your precious dream diet/ career promotion/ love-of-your-life has been terminated by "friendly fire."
 
The great good news is: ta-dah 
 
Once you learn how to demonstrate to your repitillian brain that the approaching situation, condition, or relationship is soooo friendly it becomes intimately  familiar to your amygdala, your fierce sentry will "stand down" in nanoseconds and you are free to live into the reality of your dream, "happily ever after!"
 
But Embody Success! does more than have it "stand down;" it teaches you how to enlist your brainy sentry’s support so that the same level of dedication and commitment to obliterating a threat can be channeled into a veritable "failsafe" program for making your dreams come true!
 
Pretty neat, huh!
 
To learn how Embody Success!(c) coaching can teach you how to overcome self-sabotage, email your request for a complimentary consult or simply more information:
 
Next time:
*If My Reptillian Brain’s PREverbal, Who’s Doing All that Ranting Inside My Head?
(Hint: It’s Not the Devil!)

Govt. Launches Study to Evaluate Bariatric Surgery for Teens

Mon, 16 Apr 2007 15:38:40 -0400
From:    "NIH OLIB (NIH/OD)" <olib@OD.NIH.GOV>
NIH LUNCHES STUDY TO ASSESS BARIATRIC SURGERY IN ADOLESCENTS
 
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) today launched an observational
study to evaluate the benefits and risks of bariatric surgery in
adolescents. Bariatric surgery restricts stomach size and can decrease
the amount of calories and nutrients the body absorbs.  The Teen
Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) study will help to
determine if it is an appropriate treatment option for extremely
overweight teens.
 "The reasons for weight gain are complex and multifactorial, influenced
by genetics, environment, eating and physical activity habits, and
society.  The information gathered from Teen-LABS will help determine if 
adolescence is the best time to intervene with this surgical therapy," says 
Thomas Inge, M.D., Ph.D., chair, Teen-LABS.
Overweight youth are more likely to develop serious health problems,
such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease.  Ideally, the goal for
overweight adolescents and teens is to slow the rate of weight gain by
eating fewer calories and being more physically active.  However, these
changes are tough to achieve and other approaches, such as drug therapy,are 
only approved for use in children 16 years and older.  
"We know that bariatric surgery is not an easy way out for teens to
control weight. They will still need to eat less food and exercise
more," says Mary Horlick, M.D., project scientist for Teen-LABS… 
"We hope to learn whether or not bariatric surgery is suitable for teens and 
if it will help them remain at a healthy weight over the long-term." 
Recent statistics show that nearly 17 percent of youth ages 6-19 years
old in the United States are considered overweight.  Youth are defined
as overweight if they have a body mass index (BMI) that is above the 95
percent for their sex and age.  BMI measures weight in relation to
height.  There is no BMI cutpoint that defines obesity for children.  
 
Over the next five years, researchers will enroll 200 adolescents who
are scheduled for bariatric surgery and compare their data to 200 adults who 
had bariatric surgery after being obese since their teen years. The researchers 
will collect information on the pre-operative and two year post-operative 
status of the participants, including measures of body composition, body fat, 
cardiovascular risks, sleep apnea episodes, diabetes indicators, depressive 
symptoms, quality of life, eating habits, and nutritional status.  The 
investigators will also store serum, plasma, urine and genetic samples for future studies. 
Teen-LABS is based on the adult LABS study, which examines the benefits
and risks of bariatric surgery and its impact on the health and
well-being of adults with extreme obesity.  Launched in 2003, the six
clinical centers for the adult LABS have currently enrolled over 4000
patients in a series of short-term and longer-term studies…The adult LABS study 
is expected to continue through 2008.   
The Teen-LABS study is being conducted by researchers at the following
medical centers:
   -- Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center 
   -- Texas Children's Hospital, Houston 
   -- Children's Hospital of Alabama in Birmingham
   -- University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
For more information about Teen-LABS, email the central study
coordinator, Rosie Miller, RN, CCRC at <Rosemary.Miller@cchmc.org>.
For more information about the adult LABS study, visit:
<http://www.niddkLABS.org>.
For general information about weight control and physical activity in
children and teens, see:   
<http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/child.htm>           
<http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/take_charge.htm>
 

 

TAI CHI BOOSTS IMMUNITY & More!

Release Date: Fri, 6 Apr 2007 
Subject: TAI CHI BOOSTS IMMUNITY TO SHINGLES VIRUS IN OLDER ADULTS,
NIH-SPONSORED STUDY REPORTS 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH <http://www.nia.nih.gov/>
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine 
(NCCAM)< http://nccam.nih.gov/ >
 
Tai Chi, a traditional Chinese form of exercise, may help older adults
avoid getting shingles by increasing immunity to varicella-zoster virus
(VZV) and boosting the immune response to varicella vaccine in older
adults, according to a new study published in print this week in the
"Journal of the American Geriatrics Society".  This NIH-funded study is
the first rigorous clinical trial to suggest that a behavioral intervention, 
alone or in combination with a vaccine, can help protect older adults 
from VZV, which causes both chickenpox and shingles.
 
The research was supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and
the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM),
both components of NIH...
 
"One in five people who have had chickenpox will get shingles later in
life, usually after age 50, and the risk increases as people get older,"
says NIA Director Richard J. Hodes, M.D. "More research is needed, but 
this study suggests that the Tai Chi intervention tested, in combination 
with immunization, may enhance protection of older adults from 
this painful condition." 
 
"Dr. Irwin's research team has demonstrated that a centuries-old
behavioral intervention, Tai Chi, resulted in a level of immune response 
similar to that of a modern biological intervention, the varicella 
vaccine, and that Tai Chi boosted the positive effects of the vaccine,"
says Andrew Monjan, Ph.D., chief of the NIA's Neurobiology of Aging Branch. 
 
The randomized, controlled clinical trial included 112 healthy adults
ages 59 to 86 (average age of 70). Each person took part in a 16-week
program of either Tai Chi or a health education program that provided
120 minutes of instruction weekly. Tai Chi combines aerobic activity,
relaxation and meditation, which the researchers note have been 
reported to boost immune responses. 
The health education intervention involved classes about a variety 
of health-related topics.
 
After the 16-week Tai Chi and health education programs, with periodic
blood tests to determine levels of VZV immunity, people in both groups
received a single injection of VARIVAX, the chickenpox vaccine that was
approved for use in the United States in 1995. Nine weeks later, the
investigators did blood tests to assess each participant's level of VZV
immunity, comparing it to immunity at the start of the study. All of the 
participants had had chickenpox earlier in life and so were already immune 
to that disease. Tai Chi alone was found to increase participants' 
immunity to varicella as much as the vaccine typically produces in 
30- to 40-year-old adults,and Tai Chi combined with the vaccine produced 
a significantly higher level of immunity, about a 40 percent increase, 
over that produced by the vaccine alone. 
 
The study further showed that the Tai Chi group's rate of increase in 
immunity over the course of the 25-week study was double that of the 
health education (control) group. The Tai Chi and health education groups'
VZV immunity had been similar when the study began.
 
In addition, the Tai Chi group reported significant improvements in
physical functioning, bodily pain, vitality and mental health. Both
groups showed significant declines in the severity of depressive
symptoms.
 
Shingles, or herpes zoster, affects the nerves, resulting in pain and
blisters in adults. Following a case of chickenpox, a person's nerve
cells can harbor the varicella-zoster virus. Years later, the virus can
reactivate and lead to shingles. 
More information on Tai Chi can be found on NCCAM's website at
<http://nccam.nih.gov/health/taichi/>. 
More information about shingles is available from the NIA at
<http://www.niapublications.org/agepages/shingles.asp> and also from
<http://www.NIHSeniorHealth.gov>, an NIH website for older adults.